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Astro Info Base

Links - Alphabetical List

Select the Starting Letter of the Subject:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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- A -

Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE): This craft is off to study the material emitted from the Sun and and that flows between the planets. (http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/ace/ace.html)

Astronomical League: The Astronomical League is a national organization that encourages an interest in astronomy. It is composed of over 200 local amateur astronomical societies. (http://www.astroleague.org/)

Astronomical Society of the Palm Beaches, Inc.: This Palm Beach, Florida club is very active and has much to offer. (http://www.aspb.org/)

Astronomical Society of Long Island (ASLI): Located on Long Island in New York City, with weekly meetings, it is one of the most active clubs in the Tri-State area. (http://pw2.netcom.com/~alan-5/asli.html)

The Astronomy Cafe: Conducted by Dr. Sten Odenwald, this wonderful site provides you the opportunity to ask questions, get answers, and explore the topics discussed by others. (http://www2.ari.net/home/odenwald/cafe.html)

Astronomy Magazine Web Site: Drop in on the editors and staff, and see what they're up to. (http://www.astronomy.com/)

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NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory: From the Explorer missions through those of Mariner, Pioneer, Voyager, Viking, Galileo, Magellan, Cassini and others. Visit the place where they all began. (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/)

Cambridge University Press: Based in Port Chester, New York. This link takes you to their Customer Service Department. (http://www.cup.org/)

Cassini Mission to Saturn: Learn about the mission to the great ringed planet and its largest moon, Titan. (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/cassini/)

Celestron: Based in Torrance, California, this company produces refractor, reflector, and catadioptric telescopes and binoculars, eyepieces, filters, and other equipment for astronomers. (http://www.celestron.com/)

NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory: As of its launch on July 22, 1999, it became the world's largest and most sensitive X-ray telescope. Chandra's mission is to examine exploding stars, black holes, colliding galaxies and other high-energy cosmic phenomena to help scientists gain a better understanding of the structure and evolution of the universe. (http://chandra.nasa.gov/)

NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory, Harvard Site: This alternate site is provided by Harvard University. (http://chandra.harvard.edu/)

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Day Star Publication: Based in Wheeling, Illinois, this company produced the video Evidence for God? and also distributes the magazine Cosmic Pursuit. (http://www.daystarcom.org/)

Deep Space 1 (DS1): Launched October 1998, learn about this technology demonstration mission. Using ion propulsion, the spacecraft is scheduled to travel to at least one asteroid. (http://nmp.jpl.nasa.gov/ds1/)

Deep Space Two: NASA's Mars Polar Lander carries two Deep Space Two Microprobes what will be deployed, penetrate the Martian surface, and search for water ice. Visit this site to learn more about Deep Space Two. (http://nmp.jpl.nasa.gov/ds2/)

Discovery Channel: This site provides online programs as well as information on their television programming. (http://www.discovery.com/)

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Edmund Scientific: Based in Barrington, New Jersey, this company is a wonderful source of educational supplies and well as a nice line of telescopes, eyepieces and other optics. (http://www.edsci.com/)

Education, U.S. Department of: (http://www.ed.gov/)

European Southern Observatory (ESO): (http://www.eso.org/)

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Galileo Mission to Jupiter: In addition to studying Jupiter and its moons, this spacecraft has seen a comet collide with a planet! Drop in on this mission that is still going strong. (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/)

Genesis Mission: Planned for launch in January of 2001, this mission will return a sample of the solar wind. (http://www.gps.caltech.edu/genesis/)

GOES Regional Satellite Images: See what the cloud cover will be like before you prepare for an evening of observing. Images are provided as a service of Intellicast. (http://www.intellicast.com/weather/)

Goto Optical Manufacturing Company: Based in Tokyo, Japan, this company produces state-of-the-art planetarium equipment, installed in more international sites every year. (http://www.goto.co.jp)

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HALCA: This Japanese spacecraft is providing much information on ancient quasars and distant galaxies. (http://www.vsop.isas.ac.jp/)

Jack Horkheimer: Star Gazer: Check out the web site of the world's first and only weekly TV series on naked-eye astronomy. (http://www.jackstargazer.com/)

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Jack Horkheimer: Star Gazer: Check out the web site of the world's first and only weekly TV series on naked-eye astronomy. (http://www.jackstargazer.com/)

NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory: From the Explorer missions through those of Mariner, Pioneer, Voyager, Viking, Galileo, Magellan, Cassini and others. Visit the place where they all began. (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/)

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NASA Kennedy Space Center: Visit the largest spaceport in the world and see what launches are coming up. (http://www.ksc.nasa.gov/)

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Lowell Observatory: Founded in 1894 in Flagstaff, Arizona by Percival Lowell, this observatory saw the discovery of the planet Pluto. Its staff has also been involved in much discovery, both inside and outside of our solar system. (http://www.lowell.edu)

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Mars Global Surveyor Mission: Check on the progress of the next mission to map the Red Planet. Mirror site NASA Kennedy Space Center shown. (http://www.ksc.nasa.gov/mars/mgs)

Mars Pathfinder Mission: Learn about the Pathfinder Lander and the Sojourner Rover, straight from NASA's JPL web site. (http://mpfwww.jpl.nasa.gov/)

Mars Polar Lander: NASA's lander mission which was launched January 3, 1999. The mission is scheduled to land near the northern edge of the South Pole's layered terrain on December 3, 1999. (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msp98/lander/)

MOSI - Museum of Science and Industry: Located in Tampa Florida. Check out the doings at the largest science center in the southeastern United States. (http://www.mosi.org/)

NASA Marshall Space Flight Center: (http://www.msfc.nasa.gov/)

Meade Instruments Corporation: Based in Irvine, California, this company produces refractor, reflector, and catadioptric telescopes, eyepieces, fliters, CCD imaging equipment, astronomical software, and other equipment for astronomers. (http://www.meade.com/)

The Mining Company, Tampa Bay section: This website is a wonderful on-line guide to attractions and activities around the Tampa Bay area. This link also provides access to other geographical areas reviewed by The Mining Company. (http://tampa.miningco.com/)

Museum Astronomical Resource Society (MARS): Sponsored by the Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI) in Tampa, Florida, this club site provides much helpful and educational information. (http:/members.aol.com/MARSAstro)

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- N -

National Radio Astronomy Observatory: (http://www.nrao.edu/)

National Hurricane Center: Get the latest information on tropical storms and hurricanes. (http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/)

National Weather Service Home Page: (http://www.nws.noaa.gov/)

NASA: Go to the authoritative source on U.S. space exploration, past present and future. (http://www.nasa.gov/)

NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory: From the Explorer missions through those of Mariner, Pioneer, Voyager, Viking, Galileo, Magellan, Cassini and others. Visit the place where they all began. (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/)

NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory: As of its launch on July 22, 1999, it became the world's largest and most sensitive X-ray telescope. Chandra's mission is to examine exploding stars, black holes, colliding galaxies and other high-energy cosmic phenomena to help scientists gain a better understanding of the structure and evolution of the universe. (http://chandra.nasa.gov/)

NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory, Harvard Site: This alternate site is provided by Harvard University. (http://chandra.harvard.edu/)

NASA Kennedy Space Center: Visit the largest spaceport in the world and see what launches are coming up. (http://www.ksc.nasa.gov/)

NASA Marshall Space Flight Center: (http://www.msfc.nasa.gov/)

NASA Spacelink: This NASA site provides much good information for science educators NASA activities and subjects in general. It also as educational products for purchase. (http://spacelink.nasa.gov/)

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Orion Telescopes & Binoculars: Based in Santa Cruz, California, this company produces refractor, reflector, and catadioptric telescopes, binoculars, eyepieces, filters, astronomical software, and other equipment for astronomers. (http://www.telescope.com/)

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The Planetary Society: Founded in 1979, this public-interest organization is dedicated to planetary exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life. (http://planetary.org/)

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SKY Online: Check out the web site of the publishers of Sky & Telescope magazine and other great publications. (http://www.skypub.com/)

Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO): (http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/)

Space Inteferometry Mission (SIM): This mission is scheduled for launch  around the year 2005. (http:/huey.jpl.nasa.gov/sim/)

NASA Spacelink: This NASA site provides much good information for science educators NASA activities and subjects in general. It also as educational products for purchase. (http://spacelink.nasa.gov/)

Space Telescope Science Institute: Check in on the latest doings with the Hubble Space Telescope, and learn about the Next Generation Telescope to follow. (http://www.stsci.edu/top.html)

NASA's Space Transportation Programs: Located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, this site provides information on the next generations of NASA's space vehicles, the "X" vehicles. (http://stp.msfc.nasa.gov/)

STARDUST: Look in on this mission to Comet Wilder 2 which will return interplanetary and cometary sample material to Earth. (http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov)

Jack Horkheimer: Star Gazer: Check out the web site of the world's first and only weekly TV series on naked-eye astronomy. (http://www.jackstargazer.com/)

Stargazer Seve: Based in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, Stargazer Steve produces a nice 6-inch f/8 reflector telescope kit for a reasonable price. (http://stargazer.isys.ca)

Students for the Education and Development of Space (SEDS): an independent, student-based organization which promotes the exploration and development of space through education and support of students in space-related activities. (http://www.seds.org/)

St. Petersburg Astronomy Club (SPAC), Inc.: Drop in on the oldest and largest astronomical organization in the southeastern United States. (http://home1.gte.net/hoffmanc/)

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TeleVue Optics: Located in Suffern, New York, this company produces leading-edge telescopes, eyepieces and other optics. (http://www.televue.com/)

Ed Ting, Telescope Reviews: Based in Amherst, New Hampshire, Ed Ting has a nice collection of telescopes and reviews them for others to read about. (http://www.scopereviews.com/)

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U.S. Department of Education: (http://www.ed.gov/)

U.S. Naval Observatory: It was originally established in 1830 by the U.S. Navy as the Depot of Charts and Instruments, with the duty to care for the Navy's chronometers, charts and other navigational equipment. Today, the re-named U.S. Naval Observatory is the preeminent authority in the areas of time keeping and celestial observing; determining and distributing the timing and astronomical data required for accurate navigation and fundamental astronomy. (http://www.usno.navy.mil/)

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The Weather Channel: Check on the current weather conditions and forecasts for wherever you may be. (http://www.weather.com/)

Wide-field Infrared Explorer (WIRE): This mission was launched in early March 1999, but lost all of the solid-hydrogen coolant for its infrared telescope lost shortly afterward because of a design flaw. It was later confirmed that the startracker's CCD detector could be used to take low-resolution images. This detector could be used to measure star brightness more efficiently than many large ground-based telescopes. Though very different from WIRE's original goals, this new mission takes advantage of a resource that would otherwise have gone to waste. (http://sunland.gsfc.nasa.gov/smex/wire/)

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James M. Thomas, last updated October 27, 1999.

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